Introduction to Electric Car Motors

The Tesla Roadster could very well be the most influential and revolutionary sports car ever created. In an automotive world governed by oil and oil interested the Tesla Roadster had some of the industries largest players vying for its electric motor technology even before a single Roadster had been made. It sounds a crazy story, but it is one I am lucky to be able to let.

The Roadster came very close to never existing. Never mind that for years, decades even anyone tried to take on the problem of an electric vehicle was met with hostility by the industry. Their inventive spirit would crumble under a barrage of insults, “it can’t be done”, “it’s not viable”

And for a large part in it’s early years around 2007, Tesla motors was succeeding in proving the critics right. With over 100 million dollars of investors money, Martin Eberhard the companies CEO and one of its founders and only succeeded in proving that they could produce a vehicle that when expected to retail as $109.000 cost $140.000 to make, and still didn’t have a working transmission, air conditioning and inferior seat linings.

The one thing they did have however was a battery and in truth they had succeed in the hardest part of all, the battery was the answer to the power problem everything else was just fine tuning, getting all the components on car to work with this new power source.

The battery park was the hardest design feat in the whole car and they had succeed in creating a powerful and strong and most importantly safe battery pack. Running off Lithium Ion batteries much like in a Laptop the power pack could produce 200 Kilowatts, translated into the road in the form of over 280 horse power and 0 to 60 in 3.9 seconds.

And though the car and Tesla’s finances were in trouble the future was here in the shape of that battery

In the past, when I thought about fishing gear I was only thinking about reels, rods, soft baits, crank baits – basically hook line and sinkers. But now after I have owned my boat for over a year, I find there is a lot more involved with fishing gear.

I have a 16 foot bass tracker and it is around 20 years old and the original equipment had a 28# foot control trolling motor. This unit worked great but when the wind picked up I would just have to stop fishing or drift fish because I had little control in high winds. So after a lot of consideration I decided to upgrade to a 50# trolling motor. five trolling motor batteries that you can count onto

When I looked at the recommended installation instructions I found that I had more to do then just bolt the unit on to the bow and plug it in. First if you are replacing an existing trolling motor that was installed by the boat manufacturer install the new one in the old location. But if your boat never had a trolling motor installed locate the trolling motor as close to the center of the bow as possible; it’s always good to look at another installation before you start. The old trolling motor like I mentioned was 28# and the new 50#, both 12 volts, so the original wiring was not large enough to supply the current the new unit required. So my first job was to mount the new unit; this was the easiest part of the job since I used the same brand of trolling motor – the mounting holes matched. The next step is to run new wiring, in my case 6 gauge to meet the current requirements.

I ran new wire and left the original wire intact because it is good for 30 amps and I may add a power anchor at a later date. But back to running new wire, I was able to fish the line up to the console through a protective conduit; this covered about half of the wire. Because the other half of the wire run would be exposed; a wire wrap was purchased at the local hardware store for very little money to help protect the wire. I also purchased a 1 foot section of plastic tubing to protect the wire passing through the wall of a small compartment at the front of my boat where I mounted the new higher current plug. You can purchase stay cons (wire connectors for your batteries). I found the new plug for the unit is a little costly but a friend suggested that I could use a standard 120 vac plug and receptacle with water proof cover made for outdoor use, I used a 20 amp unit; this has worked with no problems. Also make sure you add the proper size breakers or fuses to protect your investment. A battery switch was also added to my system so all I need to do is turn a switch to use my spare battery; this is definitely worth the 25 to 35 dollars.

Just one more item as a safety note; it’s a good practice to always leave the trolling motor unplugged until you have it in the water this protects you, the unit, and your boat from damage

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